Saturday, March 24, 2012

Schadenfreude

I expect in the days and weeks ahead, we'll see lots more temper tantrums about high gas prices from the citizens of what Bill Hicks calls "Spoiled Rotten Nation", not to mention about so-called "natural" disasters.

Already, Texans are whining about not having water.  People who collect maple syrup (using vacuum extractors!) are whining about a lack of sap.  Tourists who flew to DC are whining because the cherry blossoms came early and only lasted a few days.  And the lobstermen who are burning through 50 gallons of gas a day are whining about lowered profits.
Last Tuesday, from an onramp in stalled traffic
But hey, frustrated Americans can forget it all just watching Venus Angelic, the latest sensation on Youtube, which has to be the most lasciviously prurient, creepy pedophiliac travesty to ever masquerade as "cute" since JonbenĂ©t Ramsey.  Ugh.  Seems like only a matter of time before we find out how she was coerced and coached to put on that sort of performance.

I'm headed back to the urban jungle again, where Occupy will rally against police brutality, racial profiling, and suppression of free speech at Zuccotti at noon...and then to the Disrupt Dirty Fuel action at the UN later in the afternoon.  Most likely, Tim Pool will be keeping up with events at Timcast.


8 comments:

  1. Right you are Gail. The entitled masses all whine about what they think they deserve, never pausing to think for even a second that perhaps their feelings of entitlement are what led to the mess in the first place. But never mind, the God they created in their own, morally impoverished image will save the day. Not.

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  2. This poem is about cutting down trees, and I've enjoyed it some years now.

    The Raven
    OR, A Christmas Tale, Told by a School-boy to His Little Brothers and Sisters.
    by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1798)
    http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Raven_%28Coleridge%29

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  3. Killing Mother, I saw a comment somewhere about Obama that blamed his willingness to abdicate or dither or capitulate or whatever you want to call it, on climate change, is because he actually does believe in God. I wonder about that. If so, it's the final indictment upon religion because he was the last hope we had of turning this titanic around, and that hope was, for whatever reason, badly misplaced.

    Oh and that poem Anon? YIKES talk about shadenfreude! I will definitely repost it.

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  4. Good gosh, Gail, don't believe everything you read "somewhere"!

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  5. Gail, thank you for your fingers on the keyboard and your feet on the pavement.

    And the images in the viewfinder.

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  6. And speaking of whining (and god, too). . . just remember the "immortal words" of Rockhound:

    "Guess what guys, it's time to embrace the horror! Look, we've got front row tickets to the end of the earth!"

    How's that hopey changey stuff workin' out for ya?

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  7. Speaking of Spoiled Rotten Nation, I saw a whole bunch of it on display last night at the theater watching the movie, "The Hunger Games." Here was a flick subtly (if clumsily and in a typically slick Hollywood fashion) trying to impart to its audience just what is wrong how they live their lives, and they could not have been any more oblivious.

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  8. Dear Gail, If you or anyone else in Zucotti Park or in the OWS community knows someone who is attending the Population Under Pressure conference in London this week, please ask that person, any expert at all, to kindly comment on the 'global predicament' posed humanity on our watch by the unbridled growth worldwide of distinctly human overproduction, overconsumption and overpopulation activities we can see overspreading the surface of Earth. What Andy Revkin describes as "humanity's growth spurt" appears to minimize, even trivialize, a grave situation that is becoming harder and harder to acknowledge, address and overcome because human global overgrowth activities are overwhelming the finite physical resources and frangible ecology of the celestial orb we call our planetary home. The colossal presence of humankind on Earth in our time is much more formidable and fearsome than some sort of adolescent growth spurt. To describe the explosion of absolute global population numbers in such terms is jejeune and represents a subtle form of denial of what primarily threatens future human well being and environmental health.



    Thank you,



    Steve Salmony

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